Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.

19 April 2015

On This Day: Farmers cautioned on diseased cattle

Lancaster County farmers were cautioned On This Day in 1880 about the possibility of diseased cattle. The cattle were imported from Hartford and Cecil Counties in Maryland and sold recently at the Chad’s Ford farmers’ club in Chester County. The disease the cattle may carry is pleuro-pneumonia.   

Source:
 
Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 19 April 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

18 April 2015

On This Day: Teen sent to House of Refuge

A teen was sent to the House of Refuge On This Day in 1881. Samuel Herbert Wright, just 17, was sentenced to the House of Refuge at the request of his uncle James Wright!  

Samuel has lived at the poor house for the last two years and is uncontrollable. The superintendent and other officers at the poor house simply can not control the teen. Samuel appeared before Judges Livingston and Patterson who ordered him to the House of Refuge. 

Samuel formerly resided in Little Britain.  

Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 18 April 1881. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 



On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

16 April 2015

52 Ancestors: Spell That

I am a little bit late on this but how could I miss this one! Seriously, did you notice my name: Ruczhak! It was Americanized when my grandfather went to school and the teacher couldn’t pronounce or spell it (could you just imagine the backlash if teachers actually did that now?). My grandfather was born Joseph Hruszczak and his father kept the spelling throughout his life here. 

This week’s prompt for the 52 Ancestor Challenge is “How do you spell that?” Sure, there have been some interesting misspellings along the way. All in all though, my Hruszczak line has actually been one of my easier lines to trace (here in America), unlike my Walsh line, to name just one of my more difficult lines.  

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks is a weekly genealogical challenge issued by Amy Johnson Crow, of No Story Too Small 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Tea store opens

The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. opened On This Day in 1880 in Lancaster. The shop features tea, coffee and sugar. It is located at 114 North Queen Street, formerly Joe Fritchey’s jewelry store. The tea company was established in 1809 in New York City. 

Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 16 April 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

14 April 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: John & Letitia Eckman


John Henry Eckman (1848 – 1924) is buried at the Zion Reformed Cemetery in New Providence. He is buried with his wife Letitia (1854 – 1942) and their daughter Katharine (1884 – 1890). 

John and Letitia had four children in all. Katharine was born in 1884. Elnora was born in 1886. Mabel was born in 1892. A fourth (name is still unconfirmed) child was born before 1900.
 
John was a land lord, according to the 1900 census. His death certificate listed his occupation as a farmer. John was the son of Jacob and Eliza Eckman.

 


Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

12 April 2015

Christos Voskrese!

Christ is risen from the dead, by death trampling down upon death, and to those in the tombs He has granted life. ... Christos Voskrese! Voistinu Voskrese!

10 April 2015

Follow Friday: Civil War comes to an end

Bells tolled across the nation yesterday in remembrance of the end of the Civil War. It was 150 years ago that Robert E Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S Grant, thus ending a four year battle which had set brother against brother.

Blog posts worth reading:

  • Find My Past did a nice write up recalling Lee’s surrender to Grant 150 years ago. The Civil War had been going on for four years at that time.
  • Generation’s Gone By also focused on the end of the Civil War this week. She singled out a few soldiers and focused on them. A good read!
  • Reflections From the Fence also focused on the Confederate Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse 150 years ago. Carol reflected on her 2x great grandfather Solomon B. Eley.
  • The 52 Ancestors Challenge continues strong. The Week 14 Recap was for Favorite Photos.
  • The Ancestry Insider is a great blog to bookmark for anyone into genealogy, but especially those of us who use Ancestry.com. Often the posts are great reminders of the vast resources provided through Ancestry.com. For example, earlier this was a post featured the free research guides. These are great tools, as well as great reminders. No one could possibly remember everything! That said, pop into the Learning Center every so often at Ancestry.com to see what’s new or for quick refreshers.

My New Follows at Twitter:


To clarify, these are new people I followed this week.


  • @JohnHouchins is Americas Genealogist.
  • @AngieHarmon – I’ve been a fan of Angie Harmon since her L&O days.
  • @AncestryHour – not a new follow but definitely worth a mention!
  • @genchat – join the #genchat session tonight at 10 p.m. ET
Follow me

 

Follow Friday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Market stands sold

Market stands were sold On This Day in 1880 by auctioneers Samuel Hess and Son. The prices ranged from $15 - $16 for stands inside Central Market and $5 - $16 for street stands. 

Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 10 April 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

09 April 2015

On This Day: Deputy Coroner resigns

The deputy coroner of Warwick Township resigned On This Day in 1880. The resigning deputy coroner was A. B. Reidenbach, of Lititz. 

Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 9 April 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

08 April 2015

Worldwide Genealogy post looks at tombstone symbols

Last night, I posted my second article to Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration! The post is about various symbols often found on tombstones and their meanings. The link is provided below.

Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration: Speaking in symbols from the grave
http://worldwidegenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/04/speaking-in-symbols-from-grave.html

My articles appear there every other month on the 7th. So my next one will be 7 June, then in August, October and finally December.

07 April 2015

52 Ancestors: Favorite Photo

I have so many “favorite” family photos. This week’s 52 Ancestors Challenge prompt is:  Favorite Photo: Who is in a favorite photo of yours? Or tell the story of the photo itself — where was it taken, what was the event? 



This particular photo is my grandmother – my Baba (Anna Kurenda Ruczhak) – holding my twins shortly after they came home. The photo was taken in October 1998. Baba would have been 81 in this photo. 

 

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks is a weekly genealogical challenge issued by Amy Johnson Crow,
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Jacob Eckman


Jacob Eckman (1825 – 1898) is buried at the Zion Reformed Cemetery in New Providence. He was born 11 March 1825 and passed 28 February 1898, according to his stone. 

Jacob married Elizabeth Eckman, daughter of John Eckman and Susan Groff. They – Elizabeth’s parents – are hubby’s 3x great grandparents. 
 
Jacob's parents have not yet been confirmed.

 

Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Empire hook and ladder out of service

The Empire hook and ladder company, No 1, went out of service On This Day in 1880. The truck is simply being repainted and undergoing some repairs. 

Source:
Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.), 7 April 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 



On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015