Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.

28 August 2015

On This Day: Gallaghersville man injured in railroad accident


Joseph Cadwell was injured at the Kinzer station in Lancaster County, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880.

The accident occurred the day prior, on 27 August. The Johnstown express train was heading east on the Pennsylvania railroad when it struck Cadwell, a track hand. Cadwell is a single man and lived in Gallaghersville, Chester County. 

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 28 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

27 August 2015

On This Day: Chicken thieves sent to jail


Two chicken thieves were sent to jail On This Day in 1880. Alderman Spurrier heard the case and sent Jacob Weaver and Charles Albright to jail, in default of bail, where they will await court. Weaver and Albright are accused of stealing chickens from John H. Coover of Ephrata, Lancaster County.

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 27 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

26 August 2015

Wedding Wednesday: Sue Eckman weds Clay Acheson

Sue Eckman and Clay Acheson were married on 19 January 1915. They were married by the Rev. D. G. Glass, pastor of the Faith Reformed Church in Lancaster. 



Source:

The Star-independent. (Harrisburg, Pa.), 20 Jan. 1915. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. 

 

Wedding Wednesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Coal train thrown off track near Shenandoah


A coal train was thrown from its track near Shenandoah, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880. The incident happened Tuesday, 24 August in the morning on the Lehigh Valley railroad. One of the pony wheels of the engine had broke. A dozen or so cars were wrecked and three men were injured.

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 26 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

25 August 2015

Tuesday's Tip

When interviewing family, do NOT ask Yes/No questions. Sometimes being vague is better than specific. Remember to ask why. Why did you get married at that time of the year? Why did you name your son that? Why did you choose her as your matron of honor and not your sister? Why? Let them elaborate on family events!

 

Tuesday's Tip is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Naturalization explained

Naturalization – that is, the process of becoming a naturalized citizen – was explained On This Day in 1880 by the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer.  

If one arrived in the US after the age of 18, he had to make a declaration of intent to become a citizen. After a waiting period, he was entitled to his papers for the court. The rules were slightly different for those who were not yet 18 upon arrival. While they still had papers to file, they did not have to make a declaration of intent. 

A declaration was then required stating that the applicant supports the US Constitution and that he renounces any and all former allegiances. This means the immigrant no longer supported the country of their birth. 

The court also required witnesses. This was supposed to be someone who knew the person and could vouch for their person. Supposed to be and was are two different things here. It is known now – and it probably was then too – that people stood up for others because they were paid to, or they were of the same ethnic background, or because they were actually friends or family.  

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 25 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 
 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

24 August 2015

Family days

I feel as though I have fallen down a bit on the job, so to speak. I wanted to write a little about family members who were celebrating birthdays, anniversaries, anniversary of deaths, and other important days. However, I just never seem to get that done. So today, I am playing catch up and trying to work ahead!

Saturday was my 23rd anniversary. We were married in 1992 at Our Lady of Consolation RC Church in Parkesburg (Chester County) by Father George Schneider. It was also my husband's cousin's 28th birthday. I remember feeling so bad that Devin had to share his 5th birthday with us. I am sure that was not what any five year old wanted to do on a beautiful August afternoon but he is a great kid and really seemed to enjoy being with everyone.

Sunday - yesterday - was my cousin Sharon's 35th anniversary. It was also the 10th anniversary of the death of Sharon's father (my Uncle Reds)'s second wife, Margaret Glebe Welsh. I have to admit I do not recall Sharon's mom. I only remember him and Margaret. To me, she was a very lovely lady. May Her Memory Be Eternal.

Today ... today 25 years ago my grandmother's brother, Peter Kurenda, passed away. Uncle Pete was the son of John Kurenda and Frances Skrabalak. He married Anna Letnianchepi and they had seven children. Today is also the 109th anniversary of the death of Katherine O'Flaherty. Katherine is the daughter of Hugh O'Flaherty and Katherine Dee. She was just a month old when she died. May their Memory Be Eternal.


On This Day: Soldiers head to Philadelphia after riot

Soldiers head to Philadelphia On This Day in 1864 after a day of riots in Baltimore. A riot broke out yesterday at the Provost Marshal’s office involving some 200 men of the 23rd Pennsylvania Regiment. Many of the men were at Soldiers’ Rest and were drunk. The PM’s guard arrested many. Others got upset and a riot broke out. Approximately a dozen men on each side were injured.  

Source

The Evening Telegraph. (Philadelphia, PA), 24 August 1864. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  



On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

23 August 2015

On This Day: Herr raises barn


Daniel Herr raised a new barn, reported the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1880. Herr, a former Lancaster County treasurer, lost his Pequea barn some time ago to a fire. Former sheriff H. N. Breneman and Mr. John Ingram supervised approximately 100 men in the raising. 

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 23 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.
 

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

19 August 2015

On This Day: Lancaster man returns from Europe

A Lancaster man and his son returned to Lancaster from Europe On This Day in 1880. H. Z. Rhoades and his son had been in Europe for several months. They arrived in New York aboard the L’Amerique on 18 August 1880. 

Source

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 19 August 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  



On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

18 August 2015

On This Day: Union attacks Weldon Railroad

Union General Ulysses S Grant led an attack on the Weldon Railroad at Globe Tavern in Virginia. His goal was to crush the Weldon and Petersburg Railroad which ran to Weldon, NC. The Union was successful in capturing a section of the railroad On This Day in 1864. However, the battle lasted five days.  

Many units were naturally involved in that particular battle, including the 90th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry. My 4th great uncle Benjamin Franklin Van Horn was among those serving with that unit. Sadly, he was captured by the Confederates and taken prisoner on the 20th. He served out the remainder of the Civil War at Belle Island in Richmond. 
 
 

Source:
Union attacks railroad at Globe Tavern. History.com, 18 August 1864.   

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Samuel Guy & Edna Miller

S. Guy and Edna M. Miller are buried together at the Octorara Presbyterian Cemetery along Valley Road (Route 372) between Quarryville and Christiana, in Southern Lancaster County.  



Samuel Guy was born in 24 April 1879 to Samuel P. and Eliza Ann Miller. He died in November 1970. Edna lived from 1882 to 1961. 

They had several children: Laura D., Frank Robert, James T., E. Catherine, Adda P., and Margaret. 

 

Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

17 August 2015

Over a thousand men captured at Weldon Railroad


Over a thousand men were taken prisoner over the five day battle at the Weldon Railroad in August 1864. The National Republic out of Washington, DC reported that the number of men captured by the Confederates was 1,500.

Union General Ulysses S Grant led an attack on the Weldon Railroad at Globe Tavern in Virginia beginning on 18 August. The Weldon Railroad ran from Virginia to Weldon, NC. The battle continued five days.  

My 4th great uncle Benjamin Franklin VanHorn was among those at that battle. He served with the 90th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry and was among those 1,500 men taken prisoner.  

The National Republican, out of Washington, DC, gave a detailed report of the accounts and the captures. The rebels charged between the 5th and 9th corps. In doing so, they captured a large number of Union soldiers. At the same time, a heavy column charged the western lines. The lines broke and again the Confederates captured several hundred men. The total loss, killed and taken prisoner, was estimated at 3,000. 

 

Military Monday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015